A+ A A-

Chicken Lahp

Chicken lahp with vegetables and variations - lahp gai pak gap

Ingredients for a Lao raw or cooked meat lahp are extremely variable reflecting a cuisine which is prepared with whatever is readily available from the forest, stream or garden. Consider this recipe an outline of fundamentals. Once you get the feel for lahp, experiment with abandon! Serves three to six depending on the number of accompanying dishes.

Chicken-Lahp

2 C chicken, boned, including the heart and liver, if desired, cleaned and sliced (or use pre-minced meat if pushed for time)
3 T water
2 cloves garlic, chopped
5 brown or red shallots, finely sliced
3 small red chillies (or 1 t chilli flakes)
1 stalk lemongrass; use only if very fresh and tender (optional)
1 T fish sauce or padek, liquid only
1 – 2 limes, juiced (not used in Luang Namtha lahp, but used elsewhere in Laos)
2 T ground, roasted rice powder
½ C mint leaves, small, rinsed and patted dry
1 C banana flower, finely sliced (optional); soak in acidulated or salted water until ready to use

Other ingredients such as finely shredded kaffir lime leaves, coriander, lemongrass, chopped galangal or bitter small eggplants may be included as desired.

To finish:
3 small red chillies 
Mint sprigs (optional)

Accompaniments: 1 cucumber, thickly sliced; peel only if the skin is tough and bitter
Choose at least three of the following: one large-leafed green such as lettuce, cabbage or pepper (betel) leaves, one bitter or crisp vegetable such as apple eggplants or long beans, cut into 5 cm (2 in) lengths, one or more herbs such as sweet basil (pak boualapha), coriander, sawtooth herb, dill, mint or whole chillies

Prepare the ground, roasted rice powder.

Finely mince the meat to an airy paste using a cleaver or heavy knife. This will take about 10 minutes. The goal is to aerate the meat fully by repeatedly turning the mixture onto itself and mincing until a paste is created. Cover and set aside. Chop the garlic and finely slice the shallots, three chillies and the lemongrass. Set aside.

Remove the mint leaves, tearing them into small pieces if they are larger than a pinkie fingernail.

Prepare all the other ingredients to be mixed with the cooked meat.

Heat a wok or frying pan. Add the minced meat and sliced organs to the dry pan. Do not use any oil.

Move the meat about in the pan, breaking up any lumps. Add a few tablespoons of water to prevent sticking if the meat is very lean. Keep moving the mince until the colour goes out of it. Take care not to overcook, as that will both dry the meat and diminish its flavour.

Transfer the mince to a bowl to cool.

Fry the garlic in 1 teaspoon of oil until slightly golden. Add to the mince.

Add the padek or fish sauce and the optional lime juice. Mix together with your hands, squeezing the ingredients lightly while tumbling. Sprinkle in the sliced lemongrass, shallots and chillies and mix. Add the optional banana flower and any other ingredients being used. Combine. Add the ground, roasted rice powder. Mix, allowing the flavours to integrated juicily.

Taste and adjust the lime juice, fish sauce and/or rice powder. When all is well mixed, toss in the mint, combining lightly. Transfer the lahp to a serving plate and garnish with mint sprigs. Complete by tucking three small red chillies stems or bottoms upright into the surface of the salad.

Wash and trim the accompanying vegetables; slice the cucumber into thick diagonal pieces. Arrange them on a plate along with the herbs. The taste of the herbs is an important part of the lahp dining experience. Do not stint on them. Eat the herbs separately, or one or two may be included in each bite of lahp accompanied by some rice or the vegetable used for scooping the salad.

Serve with sticky rice.

Variations

For beef lahp, use steak. For a raw lahp, use only fillet. Hand-mincing the meat will ensure airiness. The lime juice and fish sauce may need to be increased to taste. Beef lahp may be served raw – a Lao steak tartare – or cooked. If using raw meat in lahp, it is essential, of course, the meat be of fine quality from a safe source. This caution is equally important if one is offered raw lahp in a restaurant or home.
For pork lahp, use shoulder meat if possible. Again, by mincing the meat yourself, a fresh, airy lahp is guaranteed. Some pork skin, finely sliced and deep-fried until crisp, can be added to the lahp for additional flavour and texture.

Source: http://www.foodfromnorthernlaos.com/2010/08/04/chicken-lahp


Information

Travel Information
Visas, borders, roads, planes...
Local Information
Phones, climate, health...
Historical Information
Siam, independence...

An Adventure

Rivers

Rivers in Laos offer many exciting opportunities for adventure. Flowing through jungle, gorges and caves, they can be wildly exciting and soothingly quiet in equal measure. There is ample scope for both...

Read more

Elephants

Elephants, Laos was once known as the land of a million Elephants. Once these majestic animals were the mainstay of travelling, hauling long distance and logging. Even as recently as the Vietnam...

Read more

Climbing

Climbing is a fairly new activity in Laos. So far, the only officially opened areas for climbing are in Vang Vieng and Luang Prabang. With the spectacular limestone landscape in Vang Vieng, north...

Read more

Cave

Caves in Laos are some of the most extensive limestone cave systems in Asia. Vang Vieng, is famous for karst mountains and caves. Konglor Cave in central Laos' Khammouane Province is one of...

Read more

Ethnic

Ethnic groups in Lao are diverse and interesting. Villages outside of the main centres differ widely from one another, in culture, craft, language and custom. There are many minority culture spread across Laos...

Read more

Buffalo Skin Snacks

If, like me, you've wondered what the strips of dried animal hide, being sold at markets and by the side of the road, are for... They are dried Buffalo Hide...

Read more

Tom and Gaeng

Tom and Gaeng - soups, There are tom and there are gaeng, both are ‘soups’ in English whereby gaeng is misleadingly translated into ‘curry’. Tom - “to boil” or “boiled” - are...

Read more

Chili Dips

Chili Dips - Jeow, there is jeow, and there is jeow. Sauces and dips are called jeow as long as these contain chillies. The classic jeow is either fairly dry or...

Read more

Chicken Lahp

Chicken lahp with vegetables and variations - lahp gai pak gap Ingredients for a Lao raw or cooked meat lahp are extremely variable reflecting a cuisine which is prepared with whatever...

Read more

Lao Clams

Lao Stir Fried clams 1 1/2 lbs clams, with shells2 garlic cloves2 hot chilies1 tablespoon fish sauce1 tablespoon sugar1 tablespoon oyster sauce1 tablespoon oil10 basil leaves1/4 cup water Soak clams for two...

Read more

Tree Top Explorer Jungle Hotel

Located inside a valley basin of the Dong Hua Sao National Protected Area, the Jungle Hotel Paksong is actually a tiny village in the midst of dense forest and surrounded...

Read more
  1. Historic
  2. See
  3. Taste
Loading…

19th Century Photos

Read more

19th Century Photos

Read more

19th Century Photos

Read more
  • 19th Century Photos
  • 19th Century Photos
  • 19th Century Photos
Loading…

Attractions

Read more

National Protected Areas

Read more

Adventure

Read more
  • Attractions
  • National Protected Areas
  • Adventure
Loading…

Gaeng Bawt

Read more

Chili Dips

Read more

Tam Mahk Houng

Read more
  • Gaeng Bawt
  • Chili Dips
  • Tam Mahk Houng

Popular Attractions

Patuxai

Patuxai (Lao: ປະຕູໄຊ, literally meaning Victory Gate or Gate of Triumph, formerly the Anousavary or Anosavari Monument, known by the French as Monument Aux Morts) is a war monument in...

Read more

Pak Ou Caves

Pak Ou Caves. Near Pak Ou (mouth of the Ou river) the Tham Ting (lower cave) and the Tham Theung (upper cave) are caves overlooking the Mekong River, 25 km...

Read more

Royal Palace Luang Prabang

The Royal Palace (official name "Haw Kham") in Luang Prabang, Laos, was built in 1904 during the French colonial era for King Sisavang Vong and his family. The site for...

Read more

Bolivan Plateau

The Bolivan Plateau is an elevated region in southern Laos. Most of the plateau is located within Champasak Province of Laos, though the edges of the plateau are also located...

Read more

Plain of Jars

The Plain of Jars (Lao: ທົ່ງໄຫຫິນ [tʰōŋ hǎj hǐn]) is a megalithic archaeological landscape in Laos. Scattered in the landscape of the Xieng Khouang plateau, Xieng Khouang, Lao PDR, are...

Read more

 Elephant Conservation Center logo

 Elephant Conservation Center

The Elephant Conservation Center hosts Laos' first hospital dedicated to elephants that are victims of logging accidents or affected by diseases. The center is staffed with an international team of elephant vets and offers free veterinary care services, an emergency unit, a breeding center, a mahout vocational center and the most extensive elephant information center in country. 
Click here to visit the Elephant Conservation Centre

foundation

This organisation was set up by a former fire-fighter and nurse who worked for the Red Cross on emergency assistance. He gathered around him a team of 34 dedicated people from Lao and trained them in first aid. It is registered under the Lao Foundation to assist the poor and was established in 2006.

Exo Foundation

Choice Hotels Laos

Selected Hotels, Resorts, Ecolodges and Cruises, each destination is a tourist attraction in its own right. The Individualist’s Guide to Discover Laos along National Route 13 from China to Cambodia coordinated...

Read more

If you would like to appear
on this website, please send
a message to us on the
Administration contact form,
which can be found in the
Contact/Administration section
of this website.

Hands

We liked the Elephant Trekking in Champasak and the shopping in the Pakse markets. J&S Gentner.
F. White.